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NANO KOREA 2022 Symposium

Nanofabrication: Connecting Science and Technology For Better Life

July 6(Wed) ~ 8(Fri), 2022 , Korea
Online & Offline Hybrid Symposium

Keynote & Plenary Sessions

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Speaker

Chad Mirkin

Affiliation Northwestern Univ., USA
Title Defining and Mining the Materials Genome with Big Data and AI

Contents

Methods for high-throughput synthesis and screening, coupled with data-driven optimization processes are a route towards rapid materials discovery. We have developed a cantilever-free scanning probe lithography-based approach that enables the synthesis of “megalibraries,” consisting of as many as 5 billion positionally encoded nanoparticles designed to systematically vary in composition and/or size. These megalibraries encompass alloy and phase-separated nanoparticles, and using these libraries, we have discovered new catalysts for energy relevant transformations, designed complex structural motifs into polyelemental nanoparticles both through computational and machine learning methods, and paved the way for rapid materials discovery and data generation.

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Speaker

Kurt Ronse

Affiliation IMEC , Belgium
Title EUV Lithography roadmap : todays performance and future outlook

Contents

EUV lithography has been adopted in high volume manufacturing in 2019 by logic foundries for introduction in the 7nm logic node. The promise of EUV lithography was to reduce the lithography costs, complexity and cycle time, which were fast increasing by the use of 193nm immersion with multiple patterning. Today, the logic industry is pushing EUV lithography beyond 7nm and used on more and more layers. In parallel, a lot of development is on-going to replace the traditional 0.33NA by 0.55 NA. In this presentation, a status update of EUV lithography will be presented.

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Speaker

Robert H. Austin

Affiliation Princeton Univ., USA
Title All Things Great and Small: The Connection Between Nano and Macro

Contents

Biological systems are both bottoms-up and top-down in complexity. Looking exclusively at either level is dooming yourself to capture the majestic scale of biology. I’ll discuss my original bottom-up approaches which inclusing ysing nanotechnology to understand biology at the molecular scale level, and then discuss more recent work at the top down-level which trys to use insights gained from the nanoscale to understand biology at the community-wide level.

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Speaker

Markus J. Buehler

Affiliation MIT , USA
Title Generative deep learning: Towards de novo nanomaterial design from nano to macro

Contents

Nature produces a variety of tough nano-structured materials, scaled up to the macro-level, with diverse functions. Notably, these are often made of simple and abundant materials, and at low energy. Such systems - examples of which include spider silk, conch shells, nacre or bone - provide broad inspiration for engineering. Here we explore the translation of biomaterials to engineering designs, using a variety of tools including molecular modeling, AI and machine learning, and experimental synthesis using 3D printing, and characterization, towards directed de novo nanomaterial designs. We review a series of bottom-up studies focused on the mechanical behavior of biomaterials, especially fracture, and how these phenomena can be modeled using a combination of molecular dynamics and machine learning. We present examples that involve deep convolutional neural networks, graph neural networks, transformers, and game theoretical approaches towards analysis and design of atomic-level material structures. One case study will cover a recent example that realizes a text-to-material design approach, developing new architected multimaterial nanocomposite designs based on human readable description and subsequent 3D printing – from word to matter. Another case study will explore the use of deep learning to design synthetic diatom geometries, which are manufactured using multimaterial 3D printing. We conclude the talk with a series of case studies of material optimization using genetic algorithms focused on grain boundary architectures and gradients, novel 3D printed composites, as well as a translation of molecular structures to music and back to assess universal patterns through vibrational patterning.

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Speaker

Teri Odom

Affiliation Northwestern Univ., USA
Title The Giving Nanomaterials

Contents

The early nanomaterials that opened the nanoscience era—carbon nanomaterials, semiconducting quantum dots, noble metal nanoparticles—can considered as the giving nanomaterials 20 years later because their combinations continue to drive advances. We will discuss how plasmonic nanoparticle lattices can be combined with quantum dots and other solid-state emitters to realize exquisite light-matter interactions, from nanoscale lasing to strong coupling. We will also describe how catalytic plasmonic materials can be used to design few-layer graphene core-shell metamaterials and multi-functional lattices for photo-electrocatalysis. Finally, we will describe the integration of plasmonic lattices with soft materials to achieve reversible and programmable self-regulation.

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Speaker

Paul S. Weiss

Affiliation UCLA, USA
Title Atomically Precise Chemical, Physical, Electronic, and Spin Contacts

Contents

It has become possible to fabricate atomically precise structures and interfaces. The key to leveraging this capability is to understand the interfacial properties, such as transport, so as to enable optimization in a targeted and reproducible way. Ultimately, we would like to be able to predict the structures formed and their properties. I describe a series of advances in atomic-resolution spectroscopic imaging that have moved us closer to this goal. We are able to measure molecular orbitals across interfaces and the conductance of buried contacts. We are also able to measure buried interactions in molecular layers. I discuss the important roles that these contacts can play in preserving key transport and other properties. Initial nanoscale connections and measurements guide the path to future opportunities and challenges. Band alignment and minimally disruptive connections are both targets and can be characterized in both experiment and theory. Chiral molecules and assemblies can control the spin properties and thus transport at interfaces. I discuss our initial forays into these areas in a number of materials systems.

Hybrid